RECORDINGS AS A LEADER

John O'Gallagher Trio - Live In Brooklyn
(Whirlwind Recordings WR4697)

John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Johannes Weidenmueller - bass
Mark Ferber - drums

As New York-based saxophonist & composer John O’Gallagher would emphatically relate, there is nothing quite like the concept and energy of a live performance to provide both artist and listener with the affecting, visceral tingle which is at the heart of great music – and especially true when it comes to the spontaneity of improvised jazz. So the opportunity to offer up these riches to a wider audience, through a live album, has always been an aspiration for the acclaimed altoist and his longtime colleagues Johannes Weidenmueller (bass) and Mark Ferber (drums).

Live in Brooklyn captures the spirit of the chordless trio’s appearance as part of Seeds Brooklyn’s intimate, weekly concert series – a popular venue for many leading contemporary artists – with realism and verve. And having forged a close, intuitive working relationship over several years, this became the perfect environment in which to unveil new material alongside interpretations of two tracks from their studio album 'The Honeycomb' (the saxophonist has also previously released on Whirlwind, with 2013’s The Anton Webern Project). The realization and “stretch and pull” of the original compositions in this conducive setting, during the gig and in playback, confirmed to O’Gallagher that this was ‘the one’ – and now the wider public have the fortuity to focus on this rich seam of in-the-moment creativity.

One of the most compelling saxophone improvisers on the New York scene, John O’Gallagher’s many collaborators have included Jeff Williams, Ben Monder, Maria Schneider and Kenny Wheeler – and all the years of experience cascade from his alto bell with a seemingly inexhaustible and colorfully individual vocabulary, supported prominently by the high-level, malleable responses of Weidenmueller and Ferber. The saxophonist explains that the blurred lines of composition and conversational improvisation are key to the challenge: “That’s the beauty of playing with these two guys – they’re masters of form and structure, yet don’t always have to mark it.”

Oblique five-against-seven-meter experiment ‘Prime’ sets up an increasingly turbulent dialogue, O’Gallagher’s forceful, rippling lines prompting heavyweight, percussive reactions from bassist and drummer; and ‘Blood Ties’ alludes to the band’s prowess in intertwining the number’s purely rhythmic beginnings with various pitch collections. The broad landscape of ‘Credulous’ prompts extreme displays, especially from saxophonist and drummer; and furtive ‘Nothing To It’ finds its animation through the close connection between Weidenmueller and Ferber.

‘Extralogical Railman’ – an anagram in both composition and title – turns Charlie Parker’s ‘Relaxin’ at Camarillo’ upside down, O’Gallagher carefully spinning the rhythmic content on its axis, then reassembling re-pitched melodics against it… and it swings with glorious abandon, the saxophonist’s lines incessantly searching, screeching and tumbling through “a number you know, but can’t put your finger on.” Finally, ‘The Honeycomb’, specifically originating from common links and patterns between tones, lets rip for an appreciative audience.

Describing the elevated, exposed nature of this three-way partnership, O’Gallagher concludes: “We are constantly listening and taking risks, creating an atmosphere which is exciting to play in – there is no ‘wrong’, and we all know the paths back. A shared trust provides the confidence to pretty much explore any avenue and be assured that everything will be OK. That transformative, on-the-edge excitement – not knowing what’s gonna happen – is what I’ve always wanted.”

The Honeycomb - John O'Gallagher Trio
(Fresh Sound New Talent 462)

John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Johannes Weidenmueller - bass
Mark Ferber - drums

On his new trio recording, The Honeycomb, the alto saxophonist John O’Gallagher fully demonstrates his skills as an adroit improviser, an incisive composer and a canny bandleader in a spare, yet potent, setting. Working in tandem with two longtime associates, the bassist Johannes Weidenmueller and the drummer Mark Ferber, O’Gallagher presents eight original pieces that exhibit his melodic and structural ingenuity while also providing fertile terrain for lively group interplay. Simultaneously spotlighting O’Gallagher’s multidimensional talents as well as the exceptional musicianship of his duo mates, The Honeycomb reveals yet another stimulating facet of the leader’s far-ranging vision. If listening to the album immediately alerts us that O’Gallagher has evolved into a virtuosic improviser with a compelling sound that demands attention, it also informs us that here is a true jazz trio –- as inventive as it is united.  

While O’Gallagher has released trio recordings before, The Honeycomb differs from those previous albums in that its emphasis lies as much in composition as it does in collective improvisation. In that respect the new album, though compact in instrumentation, is closer in spirit to O’Gallagher’s recent celebrated septet recording, The Anton Webern Project, an ambitious outing that reimagined the Viennese modernists’ work for a 21st century jazz context.  “These are tuneful songs, but they don’t rely on traditional song forms,” O’Gallager says of Honeycomb’s material, “I wanted to create forms that would provide room for each of us to elaborate on. By avoiding AABA and other set conventions, the tunes could retain an elusive quality.”
 
On such trio pieces as “Uroboros”, “Kerberos,” “Petulant Snoot,” and “Turdeken,” O’Gallagher, Weidenmueller and Mark Ferber respect the structural contours of the well crafted compositions, yet seek out – and discover - bountiful space for their imaginative playing to find full expression.  “I wanted to write tunes with multiple layers for the bass and drums to draw on, things they could contribute their own personalities to.” O’Gallagher says. ” I’ve worked with Johannes and Mark for many years now. They have great chemistry together and as a trio we achieve something special and rare. There are no straitjackets on anyone, it’s all about each of us expressing ourselves while respecting the group dynamic. That way we can achieve the spontaneous counterpoint that adds so much to the performances.” 

Exhibiting the extensive resources that the best contemporary jazz improvisers have at their disposal, O’Gallagher and his cohort specifically nod to tradition at times. “Extralogical Railman” (an anagram for “Relaxin’ At Camarillo,” the iconic 1947 Charlie Parker composition) alters the original melodic line, adds rhythmic displacements and a novel bass line to slyly transform the Parker tune, yet still offers homage to the bebop avatar by way of an exuberant performance. Whether charging (“The Honeycomb,” “Turducken”), loping (“Eve Day”) or languid (“Go Where You Are Going”), each of the album’s performances offer impressively individualized playing from three experienced band mates who respond as one.



 

The Anton Webern Project
(Whirlwind Recordings)

John O'Gallagher -alto saxophone
Matt Moran - vibraphone
Pete McCann - guitar
Russ Lossing - Hammond Organ, Fender Rhodes, Piano
Johannes Weidenmueller - bass
Tyshawn Sorey - drums
Margret Grebowicz - voice


www.whirlwindrecordings.com

For his debut on Whirlwind Recordings, New York alto saxophonist John O’Gallagher has given a bold and exciting answer to the question: “What would Webern’s music sound like if he were a jazz musician living in New York City today?” With this completely unique and ambitious new project O’Gallagher reinvents eight pieces by the “father of serialism” for a cast of New York’s most potent improvisers which features vibraphonist Matt Moran, guitarist Pete McCann, keyboardist Russ Lossing, bassist Johannes Weidenmueller, drummer Tyshawn Sorey and special guest vocalist Margret Grebowicz.
 
O’Gallagher’s vision casts pieces by this iconic twentieth century composer through the prism of a twenty first century jazz sensibility. This set of music will include Schnell (after Opus 27) , Three Songs (after Opus 25), Five Pieces (after Opus 10), Quartet (after Opus 22), Seventh Ring (after Opus 3),The Secret Code (after Opus 28), Ways Going Over (after Opus 15), and All This World (after Opus 31) in a dramatic reworking of Webern’s last masterpiece.
 

Nocturnal Prophecy
(Red Piano Records)

John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Vardan Ovsepian - piano

It seems unlikely that a Yerevan (Armenia), Spokane (Washington), Farmington (Maine) axis would figure prominently in the creation of Nocturnal Prophecy, the magnificent new Red Piano Records Release, featuring duets between the virtuoso Armenian born pianist Vardan Ovsepian, and a son of the American northwest, alto-saxophonist John O’Gallagher... But it was, indeed, precisely that connection that led up to the meeting of these two remarkable musicians.
Farmington, ME is the long time home of the Maine Jazz Camp, a 2-3 week summer jazz institute for middle school and high school student musicians that emphasizes small group dynamics with a special concentration on improvisation studies.
 
Mr. Ovsepian and Mr. O’Gallagher, both long-tenured teachers and ensemble directors at MJC, are two of an impressive cadre of innovative young jazz players who have spent numerous summer sessions over the past 34 years at the camp, including, among many others, Tony Malaby, Ethan Iverson, Ben Street, Jeff Coffin, Greg Tardy, Mike Sarin, Mike Formanek, George Garzone, Pete McCann, and Bill McHenry to name just few, a very few.

And so it was in this fertile musical environment (in the summer of 2004) that Mr. O’Gallagher and Mr. Ovsepian first met and recognized their affinities and shared philosophical approaches to the improvisers art... and shortly thereafter asked camp director, Christine Correa, if they could reserve the camp’s 2:00 p.m. slot, the jazz-literacy hour, to perform a concert of improvisations, their maiden voyage, so to speak, for the assembled campers and staff.

Ms. Correa agreed enthusiastically and the results were for all in attendance that July afternoon, thrilling, and set off a series of events that, 8 years later (at long last), have resulted in this amazing recording.

The CD whose overall title, and individual song titles are taken from the poem of the same name by the highly regarded Armenian poet Hamlet Ayvazian, is, among other aural delights, an exercise in generosity, with both musicians subordinating their individual brilliance to fulfill the duo’s uncannily prescient and precise give and take.

It is, ultimately, this sonic adventure, all about how one listens and responds to (not only) “what” one hears, but also “how” (and from where) what one hears insinuates its own particular immediacy.

There is a kind of athleticism occurring between these two young masters that is both indisputably beautiful, as evidenced by its harmonic flexibility, purity and resilience of pitch and timbre, intellectual probity and emotional fearlessness, and bi-compositionally transcendent, as in how the interweaving ebb and flow of these two music’s enhance and invigorate their respective release and realization.

Mr. Ayvazian’s words and emotional content are well served here, as Messrs. Ovsepian and O’Gallagher flit and delve around and through the moods and meanings that inhabit Mr. Ayvazian’s poem.

Once again kudos to Red Piano Records, their corresponding generosity, for presenting these two great artists (in a most demanding (and most rewarding format)) to new audiences, new ears.

John O'Gallagher Trio - Dirty Hands
(Clean Feed)

John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Masa Kamaguchi - bass
Jeff Williams - drums

The music played by the alto saxophonist, with Masa Kamaguchi on bass and Jeff Williams on drums, is one of effortless beauty as a result of years of working together. For O'Gallagher, a composition is much more than a vehicle to improvise on; it is the source of the improvisation. Whether playing free improvisations or original compositions, the truth is that everything here is meticulously structured. So, we have a composer in the good-old Duke Ellington way: he writes for the musicians who play with him, partly knowing by anticipation what to expect, and partly challenging them (and himself) to always go further. Very influenced by contemporary classical music, its solutions and ideas are used by the leader of this trio with a nod to the past in a genre known for its assimilation of elements coming from other musical languages. O'Gallagher speaks of 'opening new doors', and that's something jazz always did. Another particularity of this music is its visual character - the pieces function audibly like moving abstract images. The sense of space, line, color and density we find in painting is what this band translates to the art of sounds. "There definitely are parallels in painting and playing. When I improvise and compose, I'm influenced by a visual sense of trying to create objects and color," John O'Gallagher said in an interview to All About Jazz. "Dirty Hands" is the clear confirmation of that statement and is a recording not to be missed.
 

John O'Gallagher's Axiom
[Fresh Sound New Talent FSNT-211]

John O'Gallagher-alto sax, soprano sax
Tony Malaby-tenor sax, soprano sax
John Hebert-bass
Jeff Williams-drums

"John’s music on the CD is a very hip classical music, in a way; since the bass and drums are playing more written functions. John and Tony play beautifully; separately, and together. And the whole conception of his composing is very special." - Lee Konitz

Abacus
[Arabesque Records AJ0164]

John O'Gallagher-alto sax
Ben Monder-guitar
Russ Lossing-piano
Johannes Weidenmueller-bass
Jeff Hirshfield-drums

The abacus clicks and clacks with a dual motion – adding, accumulating, shoring up fragments against the ruins; also subtracting, siphoning off, upending sums with a quick, flicking, sluice-like motion.  A perfect image for a music fidgeting at the schizophrenic threshold of its second century: on the one hand hording its sprawling casts of characters, complete sessionographies and track listings; on the other, listing anxiously forward, nose pressed to the prow, the anxiety of innovation followed by full-bodied shadows and footsteps.  The abacus – clicking and clacking – settling scores in its ancient, beaded back and forth.  The debts of today’s music are high; but how to repay them?This Abacus offers answers with a ferocious flexibility – from the astronomical gravity in the long tones of “Completeness” to the heated accumulation and sudden scale backs in the arrangement of “Abacus” to the vibrant, conversational revivalism on Lee Konitz’ “Hi Beck” – but all of these work their way through Abacus’ primary operative formula: that all sums arise through the interaction of separate parts, individual beads sometimes clicking together, sometimes clacking apart, the joyful jazz-worn noise of imposition, submission, and ultimately, conversation.  This is the central tenet of this music’s history, the syncopated elegance requisite to approach the act – whether in joy, sadness, or simple exuberance – of music made.
This is John O’Gallagher’s starting point, his historical grounding, and from it he finds broad-based terrain on which to explore his own demanding vision.  There is his slow, spacious arrangement of a movement from Schoenberg’s “Serenade for Octet” (“Song”), his forceful attack on bebop tradition (“Hi Beck”), his quick, spontaneous exploration of entirely free improvisation (“Facing West” and “Facing East”), all sandwiched between a handful of his ambitious, muscular compositions.  Still, underneath it all there persists the time-tested fulcrum on which jazz innovation – in its various incarnations – swings: five singular musicians enabling one another’s idiosyncrasies, a cymbal crash, struck chord, or keening saxophone cry adding and subtracting the sum total of tomorrow’s music today.  This is art as the apotheosis of accessibility, achieved on this album in such defining moments as Konitz’ elliptical “Hi Beck,” whose elaborate surfaces enliven the most primal sort of entertainment – good old hide and seek (with a curious silence as to who’s “it”).  Ben Monder and O’Gallagher insisting that a sum is also a nexus, a meeting point of purposes, measures given (two? four? eight?) and taken with relish and righteous reaction. 
Perhaps righteous is a proper, if surprising, word with which to approach this music, in that it finds purpose in praise, personality embellishing and uplifting the most humble of origins – twelve old tones, a semi-steady beat, and thematic threads stated and elaborated.  It is also righteous in its use of these materials to confront – musically – the conflict between what is to come and what has been, using the art of thanksgiving as a point of resolution and renovation.  Certainly, these are not spirituals in the strict sense, but they absolutely echo the notion of individual empowerment through collective recognition; sources, sealed away in the subliminal slipstream, partially surfacing at the liminal seams of creativity.
If John O’Gallagher’s last record, Axiom, displayed the saxophonist’s mastery of the intimacy available between empathetic musicians (the softly conceived and fragilely executed “Completeness” is the closest example here), the focus on Abacus is less with the incontrovertible truths that govern this music as with the totals and tallies of its eloquent possibilities.  It contains those truths, and engages them, but rather than merely contemplating them, commandeers them with alacrity and authority.  Certainly, Axiom exhibited O’Gallagher’s talent for intense interplay, but this Abacus – subtracting a fellow reedman while adding two harmony-heavy instruments – breathes with a rounded fullness the other’s instrumentation simply could not support.  A quick-witted arithmetic, mapping a remarkable wealth of historical, musical, and spontaneous meetings, swinging refrains while sidling into the future.  Indeed, after all is said and done, the closing “Facing East” moves like a mad dash for the morning sun, throwing all the accumulated interplay of the album into the leveling possibilities of a new day, the abacus clicking and clacking its way back to life’s bare-chested beginnings.

- Chad Walker, October 2003


 

Rules of Invisibility vol.2
[CIMP 311]

John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone, soprano saxophone
Masa Kamaguchi - bass
Jay Rosen - drums

The follow-up to the critically acclaimed "Rules of Invisibility Vol.1." John O'Gallagher, is a thinking man's saxist. This was a highly productive and creative time in The Spirit Room during which lightning literally struck, and it's all captured on this volume of 9 constructions and deconstructions. Recorded February 3 & 4, 2004.

Rules of Invisibility vol. 1
[CIMP 304]

John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone, soprano saxophone
Masa Kamaguchi - bass
Jay Rosen - drums

We had a good time when John O'Gallagher (1964, Anaheim, CA) last visited The Spirit Room in February 2002. That concert was a quartet with Tony Malaby's tenor sax sharing the front line on a program of John's interesting originals. This time out, John suggested a trio playing what he termed "interesting re-evaluations of standards." As I already found John's sax lines and development interesting, the context—including the fact that he would be the lone horn voice—sounded promising. I felt Masa Kamaguchi (1966, Wakkanai, Japan), who had impressed me as part of Ahmed Abdullah's group NAM, would also benefit in the sink or swim trio setting. And, finally, Jay Rosen (1961, Philadelphia, PA) would be there to force the issue, if necessary, to a level of excellence which he and I both aim for.
 The trio arrived earlier than expected on February 3, after a previous night's gig in Rochester, NY. By mid afternoon a sound check had easily been dispatched and we had the rare luxury of relax time before supper, and time during and after supper. But, as sometimes happens when you are not under pressure, time slips away, things get too relaxed, you get behind, and the edge is lost. By the time we startedat 8 p.m., I was concerned edge would not be present, and a nonexistent momentum would have to be built.

After reviewing with the trio the essentials of a CIMP session, they opened with a group improv, Invisibility, and, not fully paying attention, I began filling out the session log sheets, something I should have done before the formal start of a session. In my head I had figured this take would be perfunctory and more developmental to the whole than anything memorable. But about 3 minutes into it I was completely distracted by John's solo and then, after the whole 8 minutes, caught upin the pleasures of the take. Immediately following, and in line with the strategy he had suggested to me earlier, John counted off and the group went into Leakey's Bag, a group improv, inspired by a familiar theme and freely improvised on the spot. The group obviously has a comfort and rapport that enables it to get to the music's sweet spot with both ease and edge. Working off sketches, moods, and ideas, and with no written music, the trio did the first set (7 takes) with only a handful of spoken words between takes but with musical excellence and interest from all members; a silent communication. And except for the opening of a piece, there was very little eye contact.

 After about a 5 minute break, the second set went much the same way. Again, 7 takes, only faltering a little at the end. At this point, we took about a 40 minute break, noshed, discussed politics, the quickly accumulating heavy snow, music and instruments. Rejuvenated, we returned to The Spirit Room around 10:40 p.m. and went for a third set. The group opened with Later Bird, John's nod to the sax from Desmond and Konitz to Braxton and O'Gallagher. By this point I felt we already had enough material, butit had seemed so easy I didn't really trust it; better to let it run its course and assess it in the morning.

A curious occurrence happened during the first take of Bouncin' Billie. Three and a half minutes into the piece, and after some wonderful playing, what appeared to be a small lightningflash exploded in The Spirit Room, visible to Masa, Marc, and myself (Jay and John had their eyes closed). I speculated, in jest, that it was caused by Jay's furious brush work. I've also included take 2, which is twice the length of take 1, because it, too, is a wonderful effort and because itis interesting to compare the similarieties and differences in approaches, especially from the drum's point of view.

 In the morning, I began the job of reassessing the previous night's material. It was evident that there was much more than a CD's worth of content. Jay's comment was, "Wow,I'm impressed." So it was decided we would do a couple more sets in the morning and if the standard of excellence was such that a second CD could be satisfied, we would issue a second volume.

 They opened the set with a revisit to Don't Move, an improv inspired by the classic Bop anthem, "Move." John replaces the tension of the original's rhythmic drive and insistence with the tension of a worried ballad stretched taut. The juxtaposition of Masa and John's introspective lines with the rhythmic dynamics of Jay's percussion is stunning.

John's playing/approach is really extraordinary as he gives just a slight blush to the subject, leaving about as much out of a line as he puts in, letting the listener finish his suggestion or allowing the momentum of a line to fall from its apex to a natural and unhurried descent and landing. And the rhythm section seems to have the intuitiveness of a long-tenured combo and the ease that goes with that association. While John has known Jay since about 1991 and Masa since the late ‘90s, the group has only been working together for about 5 months. It is not hard to believe this is a real group. What is hard to believe is that they have been an active group for only a short time as they are so intuitive and inventively compatible with one another. For me, the 2 days were an indulgence of mind and spirit, challenging, inspiring, and most satisfying. It is my hope that you will take these memorable concerts, treat yourself to a dedicated listen, and indulge yourself in their worthy offerings.

 Robert D. Rusch - Feb. 4, 2004


 

John O'Gallagher's Axiom
[CIMP 265]

John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Tony Malaby - tenor saxophone
John Hebert - bass
Jeff Williams - drums

 

The John O'Gallagher Quartet. A debut by an artist with notable instrumental and compositional talents. Over a year in preparation, this session was recorded at the end of a short tour by the group and is notable for the connectedness of the 2-sax frontline and the group as a whole. With liner notes that clearly illuminate the chronology and background of the session, it's music that is both muscular and, at times, hauntingly beautiful. Fresh faces, fresh music.




RECORDINGS AS A SIDEMAN

Pete McCann - Pay For It On The Other Side

Pete McCann - guitar
John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Henry Hey - piano, organ, keyboard
Matt Clohesy - bass
Mark Ferber - drums

 

DUNMALL/O'GALLAGHER/EDWARDS/SANDERS
FREEDOM MUSIC
(FMR Records)

John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Paul Dunmall - tenor saxophone
John Edwards - bass
Mark Sanders - drums

 

 

Andrew Rathbun Large Ensemble
(Origin Records)

Andrew Rathbun - composer
John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone, soprano saxophone 
Ben Kono - alto saxophone, flute
Dan Pratt - tenor saxophone, clarinet
Quinsin Nachoff - tenor saxophone, flute
Carl Maraghi - baritone saxophone, bass clarinet
Alan Ferber - trombone
Mike Fahie - trombone
JC Sanford - trombone
Chris Olness - bass trombone
Seneca Black - trumpet
David Smith - trumpet
Russ Johnson - trumpet
Matt Holman - trumpet
Jeremy Siskind - piano
Nate Radley - guitar
David Ambrosio - bass
Owen Howard -drums
Aubrey Johnson - vocals
Tim Hagans - trumpet
Bill Stewart - drums
Luciana Souza - vocals

 

Jeff Williams- Lifelike
(Whirlwind Recordings)

Jeff Williams - drums
John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Josh Arcoleo - tenor saxophone
Goncalo Marquez - trumpet
Sam Lasserson - bass
Kit Downes - piano

Live at The Spotted Dog - Various Artists
(Stony Lane Records)

O'Gallagher/Bain/Janisch

Stan Sulzmann and Big Band

Jonathan Silk's Fragment

Ben Lee Quintet

Sean Gibbs Fervour

Alan Ferber Big Band - Jigsaw
(Sunnyside Records SSC1494)

2017 Grammy Nominated Recording

John O'Gallagher - saxophone
Rob Wilkerson - saxophone
John Ellis - saxophone
Jason Rigby - saxophone
Chris Cheek - saxophone
Alan Ferber - trombone, composer, arranger
John Fedchock - trombone
Jacob Garchik - trombone
Jennifer Wharton - trombone
Tony Kadleck - trumpet
Scott Wendholt - trumpet
Alex Norris - trumpet
Clay Jenkins - trumpet
Anthony Wilson - guitar
David Cook - piano, keyboards
Matt Pavolka - bass
Mark Ferber - drums, percussion
Rogerio Boccato - percussion 

Frank Carlberg Large Ensemble - MONK DREAMS, HALLUCINATIONS AND NIGHTMARES
(Red Piano Records)

John O’Gallagher - alto sax
Jeremy Udden - alto sax. soprano sax, flute
Sam Sadigursky - tenor sax, clarinet
Adam Kolker - tenor sax, clarinet, flute
Brian Landrus - bari sax, bass clarinet
Kirk Knuffke - cornet
John Carlson - trumpet
Dave Smith - trumpet
Jonathan Powell - trumpet
Alan Ferber - trombone
Brian Drye -trombone
Chris Washburne - trombone
Max Seigal - bass trombone
Christine Correa - voice
Frank Carlberg - piano, compositions
Johannes Weidenmueller - bass
Michael Sarin - drums
Paul Lichter - narration
JC Sanford - conductor

 

Hans Koller - Heart and Soul
(Fresh Sound New Talent)

Hans Koller - piano
John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Percy Pursglove - bass
Jeff Williams - drums

 

Steve Lampert - Rhythms of Dreams, Rhymes of Reason

Steve Lampert - trumpet, compositions
Rich Perry - tenor saxophone
John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Jeff Hirshfield - drums
Brian Adler - percussion
Linda EPO - vocals
Jacqueline Leclair - oboe
Ken Thomson - clairnet
Dan Grabois - french horn
Damien Primis - bassoon
Gian Luigi Diana - mulit-instrumentals
Arielle Adamy - vocals

 

Frank Carlberg's Word Circus
No Money In Art

(Red Piano Records)

Frank Carlberg - piano
Christine Correa - voice
John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Pascal Niggenkemper - bass
Michael Sarin - drums


 

Bobby Avey - Inhuman Wilderness
(InnerVoice Jazz)

Bobby Avey - piano
John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Thomson Kneeland - bass
Jordan Perlson - drums

 

Steve Lampert - Zahskl's Jukebox Vol. 2

Steve Lampert - trumpet, compositions
Noah Preminger - tenor saxophone
John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Lamy Istrefi Jr. - drums
Russ Johnson - trumpert
Dan Pratt - tenor saxophone

Hans Koller - Retrospection
(Stony Lane Records)

Hans Koller - piano, compositions
John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Francois Theberge - tenor saxophone
Jim Rattigan - french horn
Robbie Robson - trumpet
Percy Pursglove - trumpet
Dave Whitford - bass
Jacob Bro - guitar
Phil Robson - guitar
Jeff Williams - drums
Christine Tobin - voice


 

Frank Carlberg - Word Circus
(Red Piano Records)

Frank Carlberg - piano
Christine Correa - voice
John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Pascal Niggenkemper - bass
Michael Sarin - drums

Pete McCann - Range
(Whirlwind Recordings)

Pete McCann - guitar
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Henry Hey - piano, Rhodes, organ
Matt Clohesy - bass
Mark Ferber - drums

Steve Lampert - Zahskl's Jukebox Vol. 1

Steve Lampert - trumpet, compositions
Noah Preminger - tenor saxophone
John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone
Lamy Istrefi Jr. - drums
Russ Johnson - trumpert
Dan Pratt - tenor saxophone

 

John Yao and His 17-Piece Instrument
(See Tao Recordings)

John Yao - Composer, Conductor, Trombone
John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone, soprano saxophone, flute
Alejandro Aviles - alto saxophone, flute
Rich Perry - tenor saxophone
Jon Irabagon - tenor saxophone, clarinet
Frank Basile - baritone saxophone, bass clarinet
John Walsh - trumpet
Jason Wiseman - trumpet
David Smith - trumpet
Andy Gravish - trumpet
Luis Bonilla - trombone
Matt McDonald - trombone
Kajiwara Tokunori - trombone
Jennifer Wharton - trombone
Jesse Stacken - piano
Bob Sabin - bass
Vince Cherico - drums



 

Billy Mintz: The 2 Bass Band... Live
(Thirteenth Note Records)

Masa Kamaguchi - bass
Cameron Brown - bass
John O'Gallagher - alto  saxophone, soprano saxophone
Adam Kolker - tenor saxophone, soprano saxophone, clarinet
Kenny Berger - baritone saxophone, alto saxophone
Ron Horton - trumpet
Dave Scott - trumpet
Brian Drye - trombone
Samuel Blaser - trombone
Billy Mintz - percussion


 

Jim Head - Zoetrope

2014 Juno Nominated Recording

Jim Head - guitar
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Chris Andrew - piano
Johannes Weidenmueller - bass
Owen Howard - drums

 

Valence
(Willful Archive)

Jeff Williams - drums
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Sam Lasserson - bass

Owen Howard - Drum Lore Vol. 2
(BJU Records)

2014 Juno Nominated Recording


Owen Howard - drums
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Adam Kolker - tenor sax, soprano sax, bass clarinet
Frank Carlberg - piano
Johannes Weidenmueller - bass

 

Jeff Williams - The Listener
(Whirlwind Recordings)

Duane Eubanks - trumpet
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
John Hebert - bass
Jeff Williams - drums

Alan Ferber - March Sublime
(Sunnyside Records) 

2013 Grammy nominated recording for Best Large Jazz Ensemble

Alan Ferber - trombone, composer
John O'Gallagher - alto saxophone, soprano saxophone
Rob Wilkerson - alto saxophone
John Ellis - tenor saxophone
Jason Rigby - tenor saxophone
Chris Cheek - baritone saxophone
Ryan Keberle - trombone
Jennifer Wharton - trombone
Josh Roseman - trombone
Tim Albright - trombone
Taylor Haskins - trumpet
Alex Norris - trumpet
Clay Jenkins - trumpet
Scott Wendholt - trumpet
Dave Smith - trumpet
Anthony Wilson - guitar
Dave Cook - keyboards
Matt Pavolka - bass
Mark Ferber - drums

Samo Salamon Bassless Quartet - 2 ALTO
(Steeplechase Lookout)

Samo Salamon - guitar
Loren Stillman - alto sax
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Roberto Dani - drums

Timucin Sahin Quintet - Inherence
(BTLCHR 71233)

Timucin Sahin - guitar
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Ralph Alessi - trumpet
Christopher Tordini - bass
Tyshawn Sorey - drums

The Joshua Shneider Love Speaks Orchestra
(BJU Records)

John O’Gallagher, Matthew Willis, Dan Pratt, Ian Rapien, Frank Basile woodwinds
Matthew McDonald, Noah Bless, John Yao, Max Seigel trombones
Jeff Wilfore, Alex Pope Norris, David Smith, Justin Mullens trumpets
Justin Mullens french horn
Eric Halvorson drums, David Ambrosio bass, Bennett Paster keys, Joe Cardello perc,Gary Sieger guitar “The Hurting Kind”, Featured Guests: Lucy Woodward vocals, Dave Stryker guitar

 

Asuka Kakitani Orchestra - Bloom
[19/8 Records 1025]

Asuka Kakitani - composer, arranger; John O'Gallagher - alto & soprano sax, flute; Ben Kono - alto & soprano sax, flute; Jason Rigby - tenor sax, clarinet; Mark Small - tenor sax, clarinet; Kenny Berger -baritone sax, bass clarinet; Jeff Wilfore - lead trumpet, flugelhorn; David Sier - lead trumpet, flugelhorn; John Bailey - trumpet, flugelhorn; Matt Holman - trumpet, flugelhorn; Mark Patterson - trombone; matt McDonald - trombone; Jacob Garchik - trombone; Jeff Nelson - bass trombone; Pete McCann - guitar; Mike Eckroth - piano, rhodes; Dave Ambrosio - bass; Mark Ferber - drums; Sara Serpa - voice

Dave Phillips and Freedance - Confluence
[Innova Recordings]

Dave Phillips - Bass
John O'Gallagher - Alto sax
Rez Abbasi - Guitar
Tony Moreno - Drums
John Werking - Piano
Glen Fitten - Percussion

Jeff Williams - Another Time
(Whirlwind Recordings)

Jeff Williams-drums
Duane Eubanks-trumpet
John O'Gallagher-alto sax
John Hebert-bass

Frank Carlberg - Uncivilized Ruminations
(Red Piano Records)

Christine Correa - voice
John O'Gallagher - alto and soprano sax
Chris Cheek - tenor sax
Frank Carlberg - piano
John Hebert - bass
Michael Sarin - drums

CIMPFEST: LIVE IN VILLACH 2009
(CIMPoL 5020-5024)

Michael Bisio-bass
John Carlson-trumpet
Dominic Duval-bass
Avram Fefer-saxophone
Ken Filiano-bass
William Gagliardi-saxophone
Stephen Gauci-saxophone
Lou Grassi-drums
Jimmy Halperin-saxophone
David Hofstra-bass
John O'Gallagher-saxophone
Jay Rosen-drums
Kenny Wessel-guitar

 

Owen Howard - Drum Lore
(BJU Records)

2010 Juno Award Nominated Recording

Owen Howard - drums
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Andy Middleton - tenor sax, soprano sax
Adam Kolker - tenor sax, soprano sax, bass clarinet
Alan Ferber - trombone
Fank Carlberg - piano
Johannes Weidenmuller - bass

 

Timucin Sahin - Bafa
(Between the Lines)

Timucin Sahin - guitar
John O'Gallagher -alto sax
Thomas Morgan - bass
Tyshawn Sorey - drums

 

Jamie Begian Big Band - Big Fat Grin
[Innova 762]

Saxophones:John O'Gallagher, Marc McDonald, Ben Kono, Dimitri Moderbacher, Dan Goble;
Trumpets: Tom Goehring, Dave Scott, Marty Bound, Jason Colby;
Trombones: Jeff Bush, Deborah Weisz, Paul Olenick, Max Seigel;
Bruce Arnold: guitar, Jamie Begian:guitar, Dave Ambrosio: bass, Peter Retzlaff:drums

 

Pete McCann - Extra Mile
[19/8 Records]

Pete McCann - guitar
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Henry Hey - electric piano
Matt Clohesy - bass
Mark Ferber - drums

Brooklyn Suite - Jentsch Group Large
[Fleur De Son FDS 57987]

Chris Jentsch: guitar; John Mettam: drums; Jim Whitney: double bass; JC Sandford: conductor;
John Carlson: trumpet; Laurie Frink: trumpet; Jon Owens: trumpet; Russ Johnson trumpet;
Brian Drye: trombone; Alan Ferber: trombone; Jacob Garchik: trombone; Kurtis Pivert: trombone;
Ben Kono: reeds; Andy Laster: reeds; John O'Gallagher: reeds; Mike McGinnis; Dan Willis: reeds.
Joo-Heon Kim - Spirit Goes

Joo-Heon Kim - piano
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Jorge Roeder - bass
Michael Sarin - drums
Owen Howard - Time Cycles
(Fresh Sound New Talent)

Owen Howard -drums
 Andrew Rathbun - tenor sax
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Gary Versace -piano
John Hebert -bass
Jazz in Galiza Series Vol. 1
(Free Code Jazz Records)

John O'Gallagher -alto sax
Abe Rabade - piano
Paco Charlin -bass
Jeff Willams -drums
Pete McCann - Most Folks
(Omnitone)

Pete McCann - guitar
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Mike Holober - piano
John Hebert - bass
Mark Ferber - drums
Freedance Live
(Sound Street)

Dave Phillips -bass
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Rez Abbasi - guitar
Tony Moreno - drums
Ron Horton - Everything in a Dream
(Fresh Sound New Talent)

Ron Horton - trumpet
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Tony Malaby - tenor sax
Frank kimbrough - piano
Mike Sarin - drums
Masa Kamaguchi - bass
John Hebert - bass
Joey Sellers Jazz Aggregation - El Payaso
(Nine Winds)

Joey Sellers: leader, trombone
John O'Gallagher: alto, soprano saxophone, clarinet, flute
Tony Malaby: tenor, soprano saxophone
Adam Kolker: baritone saxophone, bass clarinet, flute
Taylor Haskins: trumpet 
Dave Ballou: trumpet, flugelhorn
Joe Fiedler: trombone
Noah Bless: trombone
Nathan Durham: bass trombone
David Berkman: piano
John Hebert: bass
Mike Sarin: drums
Dave Phillips and Freedance - Prayer
(SoundStreet)

Dave Phillips -bass
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Rez Abbasi - guitar
Tony Moreno - drums

 
Joe Henderson Big Band
(Verve)

1998 Grammy winner for best large ensemble performance

Joe Henderson (arranger, tenor saxophone)
Slide Hampton, Don Sickler, Bob Belden (conductor);
Dick Oatts (soprano & alto saxophones)
Steve Wilson, Pete Yellin, John O'Gallagher (alto saxophone)
Tim Ries, Craig Handy (tenor saxophone)
Gary Smulyan, Joe Temperley (baritone saxophone)
Jon Faddis, Freddie Hubbard, Nicholas Payton, Lew Soloff, Michael Philip Mossman, Ray Vega, Idrees Sulieman (trumpet)
Robin Eubanks, Conrad Herwig, Jimmy Knepper (trombone)
Dave Taylor (bass trombone)
Chick Corea, Ronnie Mathews (piano)
Christian McBride (bass)
Joe Chambers, Al Foster, Lewis Nash (drums).

 
Russ Johnson - Save Big
(Omnitone)

Russ Johnson - trumpet
John O'Gallagher -alto sax
Kermit Driscoll - bass
Mark Ferber - drums

 
Brooklyn Saxophone Quartet - Far Side of Here
(Omnitone)

David Bindman tenor sax
Fred Ho - bari sax
Sam Furnace - alto sax
Rudresh Mahanthappa -alto sax
John O'Gallagher - soprano sax

 
Bob Belden Ensemble - When Doves Cry; The Music of Prince
(Bluenote)

Bob Belden Piano, Arranger, Conductor, Piano (Electric), Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor), Producer, Synthesizer Programming;
Dwayne Burno Bass; Kevin Jenkins Bass, Bass (Electric); Richard Patterson Bass, Bass (Electric);
Michael Cain Piano; Joey Calderazzo Piano (Electric);Rob Schwimmer Organ, Piano;Kevin Hays Piano;Adam Holzman Synthesizer; Larry Goldings Organ;Benny Green Piano;
Larry Campbell Guitar (Acoustic), Pedal Steel;Mike Campbell Guitar(Electric); Fareed Haque Guitar(Acoustic);John Hart Guitar(Acoustic);
Tony Kadleck Trumpet; Brian Lynch Trumpet; Lew Soloff Trumpet; Alan Rubin Trumpet;Tim Hagans Trumpet, Electric Trumpet;
Tom "Bones" Malone Trombone, Trumpet;Clark Gayton Trombone, Trombone (Bass); Birch Johnson Trombone;
Peter Reit French Horn; Joe Anderer French Horn;
Lou Marini Sax (Alto); John O'Gallagher Sax (Alto);Greg Osby Sax (Soprano); Tim Ries Sax (Soprano); Ronnie Cuber Sax (Baritone); Everette Harp Sax (Alto); Jim Harttog Sax (Baritone);
Charlie Wilson Flute;Chuck Wilson Clarinet, Flute; Mike Migliore Flute;
Ray Mantilla Percussion, Bongos, Conga;Norman HedmanPercussion,Conga;
Akira Satake Glockenspiel; Bruce Hall Tympani, Cowbell;
Bill Stewart Drums; Ricky Wellman Drums; Billy Kilson Drums; Rocky Bryant Drums;Rodney Holmes Drums;
Jimi Tunnell Organ, Synthesizer, Bass, Guitar (Electric), Vocals, Vocals (bckgr), Producer, Drum Programming, Mixing, Moog Bass, Synthesizer Programming;
Juliet Haffner Viola; Mark Feldman Violin; Sanford Allen Violin;
Tomas Ulrich Cello; Richard Locker Cello;Erik Friedlander Cello;
Phil Perry Vocals, Vocals (bckgr);Gabriel Chadwick Vocals (bckgr);Holly Cole Vocals;
Cassandra Wilson Vocals, Vocals (bckgr); Loris Diran Vocals, Vocals (bckgr);


 
Roberta Piket Live At The Bluenote
(Halfnote)

Roberta Piket - piano
John O'Gallagher - alto and soprano sax
Harvie S - bass
Jeff Williams - drums

 
Dave Phillips and Freedance
(Naxos Jazz)

Dave Phillips -bass
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Rez Abbasi - guitar
Tony Moreno - drums
Jamie Begian Big Band - Trance

Saxophones:John O'Gallagher, Marc McDonald, Ben Kono, Dimitri Moderbacher, Dan Goble;
Trumpets: Tom Goehring, Dave Scott, Marty Bound, Jason Colby;
Trombones: Jeff Bush, Deborah Weisz, Paul Olenick, Max Seigel;
Bruce Arnold: guitar, Jamie Begian:guitar, Dave Ambrosio: bass, Peter Retzlaff:drums
Frederic Favarel - The Search
(AA312-615)

Frederic Favarel - guitar
Richie Beirach - piano
Tony Moreno - drums
Peter Herbert - bass
Tim Reis - soprano sax
John O'Gallagher - alto sax
Oscar Noriega - alto sax
Dave Pietro - alto sax
Wayne Naus Presents; Big Band Express Born on the Road
(DigBigBand Records)

Wayne Naus-trumpet, Roy Okutani-trumpet, Ken Cervanka-trumpet, Matt Simone-trumpet,
Rick Stepton-trombone, Peter Cirelli- trombone, Jerry Ash-bass trombone,
Mark Pinto-alto sax, John O'Gallagher-alto sax, Rob Scheps-tenor sax, Donny McCaslin-tenor sax, Andy Bear-baritone sax,
Walter Tokarczyk-drums, Mike Dooner-piano, Mike Zavarella-bass